Happy Thanksgiving, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving friends and readers!

I know we have all experieced the averageness of 2015. There is much to bemoan in the world, and probably in your personal life, too. I’m sure.

In the world, I am concerned about the state of race relations in America, and terrorism in the world, and the dissolution of ethics that people of many philosophies used to agree on: kindness, honestly, faithfulness, loyalty to one’s commitments, loyalty to one’s spouse.

For myself, I am not thankful for my back condition, that I’ve been out of work on disability leave for two months, and that I can’t excercise, or spend time with my running buddies, or work on my wife’s kitchen remodeling project.

WHY THANKSGIVING?

On the other hand, since giving thanks—the expression of gratitude—is so frequently accompanied by genuine joy and the motivation to serve others in need, then I sincerely wish you find reason to give thanks today and every day.

Saying Happy Thanksgiving is just another way of wishing you joy.

For myself, I’m thankful for the dozens of people who have cared for me, comforted and encouraged me during the last few months. I’m thankful for an employer that pays me even when I can’t work. I’m thankful for colleagues who send me care packages and tell me I’m still needed, as well as missed. I’m thankful for the neighbor who raked my leaves, and the church group that provided weeks of meals. I’m thankful for friends who have visited me in my home and in the hospital. I’m thankful for the friend who helped me re-hookup my television and sound system. I’m thankful for a heavenly Father who has helped me process my fears of surgery and worries about the aftermath.

I could go on, but you get the idea. We choose thanksgiving for something, or someone, and we feel the soul-warming joy of it. We choose thanksgiving and it motivates us to serve someone in their need, and more easily forgive others’ their faults.

Imagine a Black Friday with less road rage, and fewer Wal-Mart fights over the lastest video game. Imagine smiling and waving on the offending driver. Imagine gladly letting the other person have the last game.

That’s just for starters, but even just that would make this a better, just a very tiny bit better, world.

Happy Thanksgiving to you all. I wish you joy.

Lon